Home Research Support Events About Us Employees

Overview
Mission Statement
Our History
Facts and Figures
Board Members
Key Staff
About Employment
Contact Us
DepartmentsMap and Directions
Resources
Press Releases
Archive Research Connections
Publications List
Links Disclaimers

 

Press Release Archive

5/25/99 - Father and Son Doctors Win Outstanding Teacher Awards A physician and his son, who both work at Hennepin County Medical Center (HCMC) in Minneapolis, have both been selected by University of Minnesota (U of M) medical students as recipients of outstanding teacher awards.

11/13/98 - MMRF Researcher Featured on Dateline on NBC. Minneapolis, MN Tim Henry, M.D., a researcher for the Minneapolis Medical Research Foundation and an HCMC cardiologist, is featured in a Dateline NBC segment, November 13, regarding a study on Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF).

10/10/98 - Children's Hunger and Growth Program receives grant to study Impact of Welfare Reform on Hunger and Growth in Children. Minneapolis, MN
The Children's Hunger and Growth Program is part of a multi-site study designed to measure the impact of welfare reform on hunger, malnutrition, and general well being of children under three years of age.

10/01/98 - Research Grant from NIH Office of Alternative Medicine to Investigate Complementary and Alternative Medicine Treatments for Substance Abuse. The Office of Alternative Medicine (OAM), National Institutes of Health (NIH), has awarded approximately $4.8 Million over a five year period to the Center for Addiction and Alternative Medicine Research (CAAMR) to continue and expand study of complementary and alternative medicine in the treatment of substance abuse.

Media Alert
May 25, 1999
Media Contact: Joan Barnes, Phone 612-347-7672, Fax 612-337-7189,
jbarnes@mmrf.org

Father and Son Doctors Win Outstanding Teacher Awards.

A physician and his son, who both work at Hennepin County Medical Center (HCMC) in Minneapolis, have both been selected by University of Minnesota (U of M) medical students as recipients of outstanding teacher awards. The awards will be presented on Thursday, May 27, at an 11 a.m. luncheon at the Weisman Art Museum at the U of M.

The father, Tom Stillman, M.D., is the recipient of the outstanding clinical teacher award for the fourth straight year (for clinical teaching during years three and four of the medical school curriculum). He is Director of Undergraduate Medical Education and Associate Director of Graduate Medical Education for the Department of Medicine at HCMC and practices in the area of General Medicine and Rheumatology. His son, Martin Stillman, M.D., is in his second year of a residency in Internal Medicine at HCMC and is a recipient of the outstanding resident teacher award.

Students in medical school are required to complete six-week rotations at teaching hospitals in certain areas, such as Cardiology and Intensive Care. They are supervised and taught by physicians who are completing their residencies to become specialist in their medical fields, as well as by hospital staff physicians. Each year, the U of M medical students vote to elect the recipients of the teaching awards: faculty from all the affiliated teaching institutions are eligible.

 When asked about working with his father, and receiving an award recognizing his contributions in the same arena, Martin Stillman said, "My father always shows respect for his students and colleagues. He seems to have the ability to teach in a thoroughly engaging, non-threatening way, creating a fun, electric and energetic atmosphere. I am very proud of him."

 Tom Stillman is also proud of his son. "I am proud of him as a father because of the way he has lived his life," he said. "I am proud of him as a doctor because he received this award. For him to get this award over 1,000 other residents is fantastic. It is really wonderful to see that Marty has developed the same love of teaching that I have."

The Minneapolis Medical Research Foundation (MMRF) is a non-profit organization whose mission is to improve patient care and the health of our community through research and education. The MMRF oversees the research conducted at HCMC.

Return to Top of Page

Media Alert
November 13, 1998
Media Contact: Joan Barnes, Phone 612-347-7672, Fax 612-337-7189
jbarnes@mmrf.org

MMRF Researcher Featured on Dateline on NBC.

Minneapolis, MN. Tim Henry, M.D., a researcher for the Minneapolis Medical Research Foundation and an HCMC cardiologist, is featured in a Dateline NBC segment, November 13, regarding a study on Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF). VEGF is a genetically engineered protein thought to grow new small blood vessels, called collaterals, around a heart blockage, improving blood supply to the heart.

 Dr. Henry and his team of researchers were one of only seven sites involved in Phase I testing of the drug which proved that VEGF was safely tolerated in humans. They are currently involved in Phase II which is designed to see if the drug is effective. In this phase, two-thirds of patients are given VEGF either intravenously or directly into the coronary arteries and one-third of the patients are given a placebo.

Alice Snook, Brooklyn Park, was one of ten patients involved in Phase I of the study. In spring of 1997, she was constantly experiencing chest pains and was told by her physician that nothing more could be done. "With each pain, I thought 'this is it,'" says Snook.

Snook was referred to Dr. Henry and was accepted into the VEGF study. She says that two weeks after receiving VEGF, her pain was completely gone and she was doing more than ever before.

 "My life has completely turned around," says Snook. "It is just wonderful to be alive again."

 Although the results are promising, the drug must complete Phase II and III testing and FDA approval before being available for physicians to prescribe to their patients.

The Minneapolis Medical Research Foundation (MMRF) has been actively finding answers to the health problems of patients for 46 years. Operating in the midst of Hennepin County Medical Center (HCMC), an acute care research and teaching hospital, the MMRF supports and oversees the medical research that takes place on the campus. MMRF is the second largest medical research non-profit in the Twin Cities and ranks in the top 11% of all institutions receiving research grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Return to Top of Page

Media Alert
October 10, 1998
Media Contact: Joan Barnes, Phone 612-347-7672, Fax 612-337-7189
jbarnes@mmrf.org

Children's Hunger and Growth Program receives grant to study Impact of Welfare Reform on Hunger and Growth in Children. Minneapolis, MN.

The Children's Hunger and Growth Program is part of a multi-site study designed to measure the impact of welfare reform on hunger, malnutrition, and general well being of children under three years of age.

The study, called Children's Sentinel Nutrition Assessment Program (C-SNAP) has received major funding from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation of Battle Creek Michigan. Other project sites include Boston, Baltimore, Washington D.C., Little Rock, and Los Angeles.

 "There is a lot being said about welfare reform by those that make and monitor public policy. " said Dr. Diana Cutts, principal investigator of the Minneapolis study and a pediatrician at HCMC. "However, there is a void of information about the impact of welfare policy changes on children despite the fact that children derive a very significant proportion of welfare benefits. It's exciting to be part of a multi-state effort to remedy that void."

 An important aspect of this project is the intervention planned for families identified as experiencing food insufficiency and families with children who are malnourished. These families will be offered information on community resources and programs working to alleviate hunger. Families who are referred to resources such as food shelves, WIC, free meal sites, and housing programs will be tracked to evaluate the success of these referrals. Children identified with malnutrition will be referred to their primary care provider and a registered dietitian for follow-up care.

 "I am pleased that the study is designed in a way that directly benefits the care of our patients by offering resources for intervention," said Cutts. "More broadly, the study gives a collective voice and representation to our youngest, most vulnerable citizens, and an opportunity to provide adequate advocacy for their healthy and productive futures."

 Dr. Cutts is the medical director of the Children's Growth and Nutrition Program at HCMC, a specialty program within the Department of Pediatrics that provides comprehensive clinical care to children with nutritional problems, conducts related clinical research, and is involved in community education and advocacy on issues of childhood nutrition.

 Children's Hunger and Growth is a designated research program of the Minneapolis Medical Research Foundation (MMRF),a medical research organization founded in 1952. The MMRF oversees the research that takes place at HCMC. The MMRF's mission is to improve patient care and the health of our community through research and education.

The W. K. Kellogg Foundation was established in 1930 to "help people help themselves through the practical application of knowledge and resources to improve their quality of life and that of future generations." Its programming activities center around the common visions of a world in which each person has a sense of worth; accepts responsibility for self, family, community, and societal well-being; and has the capacity to be productive and to help create nurturing families, responsive institutions, and healthy communities.

To achieve the greatest impact, the foundation targets its grants toward specific focal points or areas. These include: health, food systems and rural development; youth and education, and higher education; and philanthropy and volunteerism. When woven throughout these areas, funding also is provided for leadership; information systems/technology, efforts to capitalize on diversity and family, neighborhood; and community development programming. Grants are concentrated in the United States, Latin America and the Caribbean, and Southern Africa.

Return to Top of Page

Media Alert
October 1, 1998
Media Contact: Joan Barnes, Phone 612-347-7672, Fax 612-337-7189
jbarnes@mmrf.org

Research Grant from NIH Office of Alternative Medicine to Investigate Complementary and Alternative Medicine Treatments for Substance Abuse.

Minneapolis, MN. The Office of Alternative Medicine (OAM), National Institutes of Health (NIH), has awarded approximately $4.8 Million over a five year period to the Center for Addiction and Alternative Medicine Research (CAAMR) to continue and expand study of complementary and alternative medicine in the treatment of substance abuse.

The CAAMR was initially established in 1994 through an NIH grant award to the Minneapolis Medical Research Foundation (MMRF). The current grant award will allow the CAAMR to expand both the size and scope of its research activities.

The economic cost of substance abuse to the nation is estimated at $257 billion annually (Sirica, Coimbra, 1995). This figure is based on factors such as health care expense and lost productivity. The negative impact of substance abuse can be measured in every social institution including the community, the workplace, the schools, and the family. While a variety of treatment options are available, conventional interventions have demonstrated limited success in clinical trials.

 The CAAMR has been involved in several research projects to determine the efficacy of unconventional therapies for substance abuse. During the grant period, researchers led by Thomas J. Kiresuk, Ph.D., will extend their preliminary research on treatments such as herbal compounds and acupuncture conducting trials of safety and efficacy, and begin the investigation of other innovative treatments. Dr. Kiresuk stated, "This is a unique opportunity to establish a stable resource base for the investigation of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) and to produce research that is intellectually stimulating and clinically relevant."

 Initial projects include the continuation of research on the safety and efficacy of a traditional Chinese herbal formula for the treatment of alcohol abuse. Preliminary work will be extended by studying the compound in human populations.

 Preliminary research on the use of electroacupuncture to alleviate nicotine withdrawal symptoms will continue as the CAAMR investigates the behavioral aspects of electrical acupuncture. The long term goal of this research is to identify neural substrates involved in the development and maintenance of drug abuse.

 Hepatitis C (HCV) affects the majority of intravenous drug users, and is common among individuals with chronic alcoholism. With center support, researchers will study an herbal formula for its remediation of HCV symptomology.

The CAAMR also will devote resources to establish a career development program to support trainees seeking education and research experience in alternative medicine and the addictions.

The CAAMR's work will be overseen by an advisory board composed of national authorities in epidemiology, biostatistics, basic science, alternative and complementary medicine, addiction research, and members of the community.

The OAM was mandated by Congress in 1991 for the purpose of developing, coordinating, and supporting CAM research, research training, and disseminating the results of its research efforts to the public. The OAM advocates quality science, rigorous research, and objective scientific inquiry into which CAM practices work, and those that do not work, in order to fulfill its mission of providing reliable scientific information on the benefits and/or risks of CAM therapies to the public.

The CAAMR was one of the two original research Centers funded by the OAM in 1994. Since that time the OAM has funded eleven centers in several theme areas including pain, cancer, and aging.

The CAAMR is a dedicated center for research and is unable to recommend specific physicians, practitioners, clinics or treatment facilities, or therapies. For consumer information regarding complementary and alternative medicine, please contact the Office of Alternative Medicine Clearinghouse: 1-888-NIH OCAM (644-6226). Public inquiries regarding the treatment of substance abuse should be directed to either a local chemical dependency treatment provider or the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence Hopeline: 1-800-NCA CALL (622-2255)

Return to Top of Page

 

 
   

Printing Information

Home | Research | Support | Events | About Us | Employees
Site Map | Contact Us |
HCMC | MHP | HFA

 


Warning: include_once(../../stats/script.php): failed to open stream: No such file or directory in /home/yo036198/public_html/mmrfweb.org/aboutus/resources/Archive.html on line 451

Warning: include_once(): Failed opening '../../stats/script.php' for inclusion (include_path='.:/usr/lib/php:/usr/local/lib/php') in /home/yo036198/public_html/mmrfweb.org/aboutus/resources/Archive.html on line 451